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Awards

Mardi 11 mars 2 11 /03 /Mars 23:30
- Publié dans : Awards

L'intronisation de Madonna au 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'.
 

Madonna is inducted by Justin Timberlake.
Madonna est intronisée par Justin Timberlake.

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame' Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'
 

Madonna arrives.
Madonna arrive.

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'
 

Justin gives the award to Madonna.
Justin remet la récompense à Madonna.

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'  Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'
 

Madonna's acceptance speech.
Le discours de Madonna.

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'  Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Madonna's induction into the 'Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame'

Iggy Pop and The Stooges paid tribute to Madonna performing 'Burning Up' and 'Ray of Light'.
Iggy Pop recited lyrics from 'Like a Virgin' at the end of his performance.
Iggy Pop et The Stooges ont rendu hommage à Madonna en jouant 'Burning Up' et 'Ray of Light'.
Iggy Pop a récité quelques paroles de 'Like a Virgin' à la fin de sa performance.



Photos: AP/Reuters.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Lundi 10 mars 1 10 /03 /Mars 23:00
- Publié dans : Awards

Madonna will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at 8:30 p.m. tonight at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. The ceremony will be broadcast live by VH1 Classic and streamed live on the Internet at www.bestbuy.com/halloffame.
 

The 2008 inductees were chosen by the 600 voters of the Hall of Fame Foundation. Artists are eligible for inclusion 25 years after their first recording, making this the first year that Madonna has been eligible.
 

The ceremony will honor seven inductees: Madonna, Leonard Cohen, The Dave Clark Five, John Mellencamp, Gamble & Huff, The Ventures and Little Walter.
 

Madonna is inducted by Justin Timberlake.
 

Iggy & The Stooges
will perform for Madonna.
 


Click the pic below to watch the ceremony live on the internet.
Regardez la cérémonie d'intronisation de Madonna au 'Rock and Roll Hall of Fame' 
en direct sur internet. Cliquez sur l'image ci-dessous.

 

Watch 'The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame' Induction Ceremony live tonight

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Lundi 10 mars 1 10 /03 /Mars 22:50
- Publié dans : Awards

Madonna rejoint le US Hall of Fame plus tard ce soir.
 

Madonna will be inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame later.
John Mellencamp, The Ventures, Leonard Cohen and The Dave Clark Five, will also be honoured at the 23rd annual induction ceremony in New York.


The nominees are chosen by a committee and are whittled down to a final list of five by more than 600 music experts.
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame president Joel Peresman said: "From poetry to pop, these five acts demonstrate the rich diversity of rock and roll."
He added: "The 2008 inductees are trailblazers - all unique and influential in their genres."
Acts only become eligible to be considered for the honour 25 years after their first recording.
Madonna will be inducted by pop star Justin Timberlake and Iggy & The Stooges will perform on her behalf.
Bittersweet
The star signed her first US record deal in 1982, and scored her first hit with Holiday in the UK two years later.
The 49-year-old has constantly altered her image and embraced different musical styles.
For British band The Dave Clark Five the event will be bittersweet, following the death of lead singer Mike Smith, 64, last month from pneumonia.
He had been paralyzed from the waist down after suffering a spinal cord injury in 2003.
"He was extremely excited and honoured to have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and I am glad that he will be remembered as a 'Hall of Famer' because he was in so many ways," Smith's agent, Margo Lewis, said when he died.
Glad All Over helped The Dave Clark Five become one of the most successful British "invasion" bands of the US during the 1960s.
Indiana native Mellencamp became a voice of America's heartland with hits like Pink Houses.
"I'm very honoured and pleased to be recognised this way, especially among people whom I greatly admire," Mellencamp said on his website.
He will be inducted by Billy Joel and will perform at the ceremony.
Cohen became a folk icon in the late 1960s with songs such as Suzanne and Dress Rehearsal Rag.
Lou Reed will induct him and singer Damien Rice will perform for him.
The Ventures defined instrumental guitar rock in the 1960s with surfer anthems like Walk Don't Run and Hawaii Five-O.
Last year's inductees were REM, Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Van Halen, the Ronettes and Patti Smith.
Once included, the artists are featured in the Museum's Hall of Fame exhibit.
This includes a computerised jukebox containing every song of each inductee and a film played on three big screens recounting their careers and music.

Source: BBC News.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Lundi 10 mars 1 10 /03 /Mars 22:23
- Publié dans : Awards

Le Rock and Roll Hall of Fame intronise Madonna et Cohen.
 

By Michelle Nichols
Mon Mar 10, 8:24 AM ET


NEW YORK (Reuters) - Pop star Madonna, folk singer Leonard Cohen, rocker John Mellencamp, British pop band The Dave Clark Five and instrumental group The Ventures will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Monday.
The five artists have been chosen by 600 music industry professionals, and beat out disco queen Donna Summer, New York-based funk group Chic, rap pioneer Afrika Bambaataa and hip-hop group The Beastie Boys for the 23rd annual induction.
Artists become eligible for the Hall of Fame 25 years after the release of their first single or album and are represented in an exhibition at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame museum in Cleveland, Ohio.
"The 2008 inductees are trailblazers -- all unique and influential in their genres," said Joel Peresman, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation president. "From poetry to pop, these five acts demonstrate the rich diversity of rock and roll."
For '60s British band The Dave Clark Five -- Dave Clark, Lenny Davidson, Rick Huxley, Denis Payton and Mike Smith -- the induction will be bittersweet after lead singer Smith, 64, died late last month from pneumonia.
He had been paralyzed from the waist down after suffering a spinal cord injury in 2003.
"He was extremely excited and honored to have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and I am glad that he will be remembered as a Hall of Famer because he was in so many ways," Smith's agent, Margo Lewis, said when he died.
The Dave Clark Five topped the British charts in 1965 with "Glad All Over" and were described by the foundation as "an enormous pop phenomenon" before disbanding in 1970. The group has sold more than 50 million albums to date.
The band will be inducted by actor Tom Hanks and there will be a special performance in its honor.

MADONNA'S VERY FIRST TIME
While The Dave Clark Five and Mellencamp had been nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame before, this was the first year Madonna was eligible. She will be inducted by pop star Justin Timberlake and Iggy & The Stooges will perform on her behalf.
Madonna, 49, made her debut in 1982 and her first album "Madonna" included hits such as "Holiday," "Borderline" and "Lucky Star" which helped her become one of the best-selling pop artists, with more then 200 million albums sold worldwide.
Mellencamp released his first album in 1976 and has often sung about the flawed American dream, which led the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation to dub him a "symbol of the hopes, struggles and passions of America's heartland."
"I'm very honored and pleased to be recognized this way, especially among people whom I greatly admire," Mellencamp said on his Web site, www.mellencamp.com. He will be inducted by entertainer Billy Joel and will perform at the ceremony.
Cohen, a gravel-voiced Canadian whose songs tell of love and sex, faith and betrayal, is among the most literary of songwriters. He published four books of poetry and two novels before trying music, partly to escape life as a starving artist.
The foundation described him as "folk rock icon of the singer songwriter movement." He will be inducted by Lou Reed and Irish folk singer Damien Rice will perform for him.
Hits by the Ventures -- Bob Bogle, Nokie Edwards, Gerry McGee, Mel Taylor, Don Wilson -- include "Walk Don't Run" and "Hawaii Five-O" and the foundation credits the band with defining instrumental guitar rock in the 1960s.
The group will be inducted by John Fogerty and will perform at the New York City ceremony.
Along with the five performers, the songwriting and producing team of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff will be inducted in the non-performer category and the late Little Walter in the "sideman" category for his "pioneering use of the microphone (that) helped establish the modern blues harmonica."

Source: Reuters.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Lundi 10 mars 1 10 /03 /Mars 21:48
- Publié dans : Awards

Madonna, Mellencamp mènent les intronisés au Rock Hall.


Annual Ceremony Held To Honor Rock, Blues Legends
David Hyland, Staff Writer
UPDATED: 3:41 pm CDT March 9, 2008

Back when it was founded in the mid-1980s, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame probably seemed like a great idea to the cigar-chomping moguls who dreamt it up.
They thought the giants of rock'n'roll's golden era were elderly or rapidly becoming so and the music's primary delivery mechanisms -- record labels, rock radio, Rolling Stone magazine and MTV -- were arguably at the very pinnacle of their power and influence in defining what this music was. They had the money to honor their personal heroes and the clout to decide who would make it past the gates.
Twenty-two years later, however, the world is a very different place. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and its annual induction of successive waves of supposedly legendary artists are now more renown for the struggle to attract an audience in a crowded media landscape as well as the controversies and criticisms that the Hall of Fame has been increasingly forced to weather. This honor has become just another shameless scramble for publicity and one that too often appears to have an invisible hand guiding the process.
Those problems notwithstanding, perhaps the biggest challenge for this year's ceremony, set for Monday at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, is the rather dull lineup of inductees. Boasting only one bona fide superstar -- Madonna -- the rest of this year's class reads like it was culled from a random playlist swiped from the "Charlie" or "Jack" radio station format: John Mellencamp, Leonard Cohen, the Dave Clark Five and the Ventures. Cohen remains one of rock's most underappreciated songwriters and Madonna was an iconic figure in the '80s and early '90s pop scene, but the rest seem like filler. Furthermore, none promise either the intra-band drama of last year's induction of Van Halen or the performance fireworks of say Led Zeppelin or Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band reuniting.
Like any other award show, the ceremony wants to create a splash, which remains the chief focus each time artists are inducted. Indicative of the public's apathy for the event, which is hosted by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation, is how weak ratings have forced the ceremony to slowly fade off TV. The show continued to slide from being broadcast in its entirety on VH1, to airing as a condensed, highlight-heavy version broadcast days later on VH1 and then bumped to the expanded cable Twilight Zone of VH1 Classics. This year's ceremony will also be livestreaming in its entirety on Best Buy's Web site.
Not helping matters are the continual snipes about who is in and who isn't in the hall and how the whole selection process is conducted. Early on, it was usually a no-brainer. Who's going to argue that Chuck Berry or Bob Marley or the Rolling Stones belong there? But, examining the full roster of past inductees, we certainly see that they certainly conform to a commercial-oriented, classic-rock-slanted vision of history. The selection process is the key point of contention because it appears as suspiciously undemocratic as the superdelegates battle being waged in the Democratic presidential primary. Those artists inducted are selected by several hundred music industry elites (musicians, journalists, business figures) from a list of approved nominees. The top five acts are then inducted. (The roster of this year's nominees who apparently didn't make the cut included the Beastie Boys, Donna Summer, Chic and Afrika Bambaataa.)
The fact that neither the nominating process nor the voting are open to the public -- and even what people are identified as worthy of voting -- continue to mire the Hall of Fame. Add to this the hubbub that erupted last year when a Fox News article alleged that 2008 inductee, the Dave Clark Five, actually had enough votes to win last year, but Rolling Stone founder and Hall of Fame bigwig Jann Wehner interceded so that Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five were allowed ahead of the Dave Clark Five because he felt a hip-hop act needed to be represented. Hall of Fame officials denied these charges.
There were no such accusations this year, but then, this might be because no one really cares. In fairness, each act did impact the rock world in a particular time and place. Whether their contributions merit a spot when compared to past inductees or in place of many who still aren't in the hall are questions for debate.

This year's inductees include:

Madonna

In the 1980s, Madonna was pop music's Castor to Michael Jackson's Pollux. She became perhaps decade's most preeminent performer and star who's influence extended beyond music into fashion, film and politics.
In contrast to Jackson, however, Madonna had little musical skills. She used her dancing abilities, her charisma, her business savvy and her willingness to be a lightning rod in the culture wars to propel her career to the very heights in the music world. Musically, Madonna is a creative vampire who has relied on pop and dance's hottest producers to craft singles that she can then front.
Her biggest albums -- "Like A Prayer," "True Blue" and "Like A Virgin" -- became multi-platinum smashes and her singles were ubiquitous on radio and especially MTV. So powerful was her pop persona that she was continually allowed to make a string of horrific movie appearances despite proving that she was box-office poison.
Given her astuteness for harnessing publicity, it shouldn't be surprise then that Madonn has a new album slated for release next month with contributions from members of pop music's ruling Politburo Justin Timberlake, Timbaland and Pharrell Williams. Look for her performance to be the most high-energy of the night. Timberlake will be inducting the former Material Girl.

John Mellencamp
Indiana boy John Mellencamp had a less ever-present run as Madonna did in the '80s, but he did have a gift for crafting anthemic, feel-good rockers.
Mellencamp had no problem pretending to be a character from a '50s teen rebellion movie. Cigarette in his mouth, white T-shirt on, sitting astride a motorcycle, Mellencamp embodied the myth and hope fans would too. Many did. His monster albums, particularly "Scarecrow," briefly threatened to make him the Heartland's answer to Bruce Springsteen.
His "Jack And Diane" might merit in spot on the list of the greatest rock songs of all time. Mellencamp in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame does not.
Billy Joel will be doing the honors for Mellencamp.

Leonard Cohen
Canadian Leonard Cohen was one of the luminaries of the '70s singer-songwriter period, but one whose dark, romantic and literary style continues to be largely unheralded by the public at large. Songs like "Suzanne," "So Long Marianne," "Bird On A Wire" and the Jeff Buckley-covered "Hallelujah" became overlooked treasures of the pop music lexicon.
Thirty years on, Cohen's career continues to operate much as it has -- below the radar. A 2006 documentary, "Leonard Cohen: I'm Your Man," introduced him to a wider audience no doubt because of the appearance of U2 and other better-known fans.
While Cohen has continued to release albums, it's chiefly his '70s output that has positioned him to be inducted. Like Madonna, Cohen is using his induction as part of an effort to boost his career. He's launching a world tour in the spring. Fellow gloom-aphile Lou Reed will be inducting Cohen on Monday night.

The Dave Clark Five
Only superfans would really argue that the Dave Clark Five rivaled the Beatles when both British groups shared a lust in the early '60s for pop-chart dominance. In a few short years, the Beatles became figures in Western culture and morphed into album-focused artistes, the Five were still striving to be a better singles band.
The Dave Clark Five certainly had an impressive run of singles. Cuts like "Glad All Over," "Catch Us If You Can" and "Over and Over" were hits on both sides of the Atlantic, but they their popularity nosedived as music tastes became more sophisticated as the '60s came to an end.
Like Mellencamp, the band's induction is questionable. It certainly puts them on par with other questionable Hall of Famers like the Lovin' Spoonful, the Jefferson Airplane and the Animals.
It's likely that the ceremony's most touching moments will stem from the band's induction as the group's singer, Mike Smith, died only a few days ago. The 64-year-old, who was paralyzed from the ribs down after a spinal cord injury suffered in 2003, died on pneumonia, according to press reports. Tom Hanks is expected to induct the band.

The Ventures
You can be sure those seeking to get the Hall of Fame ceremony back on TV are tepid about the inclusion of the Ventures this year.
Like Cohen, the group, best known as one of the progenitors of California surf music, is mostly being honored for being an influence on other artists. Members of the Beatles, the Beach Boys and other Baby Boomer bands have pointed to the band and their instrumental as keys in their musical development. Fan John Fogerty will be inducting the group.
Beyond the performers, the Hall has two other categories to recognize others' contributions. In the non-performer category, '70s songwriters/producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff are being inducted this year for their dozens of hits with non-Motown R&B/soul music acts, including Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, Dusty Springfield and the O'Jays. In the condescendingly named sideman category, blues harp master Little Walter is being inducted for his contributions on seminal albums by Muddy Waters.
If we look at this year's class as a harbinger, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has a bleak future in recognizing the past. 
 

Note: The Hall of Fame induction ceremony will be livestreaming on Best Buy's Web site on Sunday night.

For More Info:
Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame's Official Web Site
www.rockhall.com

 
Source: NBC 5 Chicago.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Dimanche 9 mars 7 09 /03 /Mars 19:20
- Publié dans : Awards

Madonna appartient-elle au rock hall of fame?
 

BY BRIAN McCOLLUM • FREE PRESS MUSIC CRITIC • March 9, 2008


Madonna? Glittery, poppy, Hollywood-beloved Madonna? In the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Rock and Roll?
It's all about semantics.
As the Michigan-born superstar readies for her induction Monday night at a swanky Manhattan ceremony, furrowing the brows of certain rock-music devotees, the perennial question is once again on the table:
What is rock 'n' roll, anyway?
The enticing answer for cynics is that it is whatever Jann Wenner thinks it is. The Rolling Stone magazine founder, who led the rock hall's founding more than two decades ago, has been the most common target of ire, loosely accused of playing personal favorites in a secretive backroom operation.
But beyond conspiracy theories, the question gets to the very heart of the mission for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and its Cleveland museum.
We've heard the carping before: when Michael Jackson was inducted in 2001, for instance, or when hip-hop's Grandmaster Flash was honored last year. Madonna's hall of fame selection was announced in December, her name unveiled alongside those of John Mellencamp, the Ventures, Leonard Cohen and the Dave Clark Five. She was among a rarefied cast of inductees -- chosen in her first year of eligibility, or 25 years after the release of her first record.
In Detroit Rock City, any hometown allegiance fell by the wayside as some Freep.com users immediately kicked into attack mode.
"Rock and Roll Hall of LAME!"
"Since when is that crap rock and roll?"
"The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is a joke. All you have to do is be around for 25 years and you're in."
Of course, it's not actually that easy, or supporters of overlooked groups such as Kiss, Rush and Detroit's Iggy Pop & the Stooges wouldn't feel perpetually slighted by the rock hall.
So what is rock 'n' roll? Is it amplified guitar, bass and drums? Is it a specific attitude? Is it a certain strand of culture as defined and decreed by the baby-boom tastemaker set?
For the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, here's what it is: an era. The rock era, to be exact -- a term commonly used to signify the past six decades of popular music, a period that began in July 1955 when Bill Haley's "(We're Gonna) Rock Around the Clock" hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. In that sense, "rock era" is simply shorthand for the period that began when American pop music became inextricably bound up with youth culture.
"We define it pretty broadly. It's somewhat about the influences, somewhat about the attitude. But more than anything it's about a cultural phenomenon," says Jim Henke, curator of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. "It's certainly more than just four white guys playing guitars, bass and drums."
Henke says museum visitors arrive with wildly differing definitions; he's heard some argue that even such bands as U2 don't fit the rock 'n' roll mold. Others are more open-minded: Henke was gratified when rapper Chuck D, on hand for the opening of a hip-hop exhibit, told reporters that his music was a natural chapter in rock's ongoing story.

As rock 'n' roll as they come
You won't persuade Blain Klein that Madonna doesn't deserve induction. Klein knows his Madonna: The Kalamazoo resident helped start the Madonna Fest, a global fan convention staged annually in the 1990s. On Monday, he'll gather with about 20 friends for what they've dubbed an induction party.
Madonna's song catalog may not be packed with gritty three-chord numbers, Klein says, but in spirit the Bay City native is as rock 'n' roll as they come.
"Madonna put in her time: She started as a nobody with a garage band, played the club scene in New York, got noticed, and evolved into the queen of pop icon," he says. And her antiestablishment credentials are impeccable, Klein points out: "She's the only person I know of who walked off David Letterman after telling him off."
Perhaps the situation wouldn't be so ripe for debate if this had always been the obvious standard by which the hall operated. If the early years had included inductees such as Connie Francis and Bobby Vinton next to the likes of Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley, the precedent would have been firmly fixed into place: We're using the "rock era" definition of popular music, folks, and that means eventually, yeah, we're gonna get to disco.
But then again, maybe it quietly did. The hall is well stocked, for instance, with acts from Motown's golden era -- Detroit groups such as the Supremes, the Four Tops and the Temptations, who certainly don't fit the rebels-with-guitars definition that many observers now insist on applying. They operated in an era when "rock 'n' roll" might as well have been synonymous with "Top 40": a repository of common tastes.
That held firm until the post-Woodstock era of the 1970s. Rock 'n' roll had morphed into "rock," and a gulf had opened up between rock's subculture and the wider pop-music world. Invariably, the traits and sensibility of that subculture -- the long hair, the loud guitars, jeans and tattoos -- are what many rock fans have in mind when they blast Madonna as an unwanted guest.
Perhaps the hall itself could snuff out this whole brouhaha -- which is only set to intensify as the eligibility period chugs into the neon-pop 1980s -- with a simple, clear statement of purpose. Let the public intuitively understand what's meant by "rock 'n' roll," set the record straight, and we'll all move on to arguing about the annual nominees for other reasons.
Or maybe not. Rock's factional loyalties are part of a tension that has marked popular music for decades, perhaps most memorably symbolized by the infamous Disco Demolition Night in 1979. That's when thousands of beer-fueled rock fans wreaked havoc at Chicago's Comiskey Park, turning a Tigers-White Sox baseball game into a boisterous anti-disco rally. Disco slipped to the sidelines within a couple of years, but popular music's fragmentation continued, splintering to the point that the traditional Top 40 concept no longer exists.
Those who can't be convinced Madonna belongs are only destined for more angst as they become dimly aware of their real nightmare: In just 11 years, the Backstreet Boys will be eligible for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Source: Detroit Free Press.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Dimanche 9 mars 7 09 /03 /Mars 19:02
- Publié dans : Awards

Le catalogue de musique de Madonna montre pourquoi elle est un vrai Hall of Famer.
 

Sunday, March 9th 2008, 4:00 AM


They've called her everything from a creative cretin to a media whore (if not a literal one). So there must be scores of folks who consider it the greatest desecration to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame yet that Monday its arbiters will usher into its heady ranks Miss "How-Dare-She" herself: Madonna.
On her first try yet.
Foes will insist that Madonna's fast-track entry has only to do with sales. Or with notoriety. Or with corporate conflicts of interest (especially since the hall has nearly as many as a New Jersey politician).
They'll say Madonna's anointment has to do with anything but the one element that actually most helped grease her way in: the music.
The fantastic range of distractions that surround that music - some ridiculous, some delightful - have obscured this all along.
But if you push aside the headlines, the pictures, the fashion, the scandals and the gossip, and give a fair listen to the 11 full studio albums Madonna has produced in the last 25 years, you may be surprised by what you hear.
The catalogue speaks eloquently of her achievements - from watershed innovations to savvy tweaks of genre to the basic pursuit of a great hook and an irresistible groove. Sometimes Madonna's greatest accomplishments have even come down to the thing she has been most loudly ridiculed for: her singing.
No, she's not Aretha Franklin. She's not even close to Cyndi Lauper, the singer who, it was predicted, would leave Madonna in the dust by the next album when they both began in 1983. But Madonna has a quality that makes her vocals a key part of her songs' overall swirl of delight.
She has had this from the start, even when her voice was a mere yap of a thing. In her earliest single, the club-magnet "Everybody," she had an insistence in her delivery - a kind of zeal - as well as an exuberance in her tone, that made up for any lack of cri de coeur.
The next single, "Burnin' Up," went further. Its tight riff was fired by a punky fervor. Better, the song's blaring guitar work now serves as a swift rebuke to those who get too literal about the "rock" part of this Hall of Fame thing. But then, Madonna would hardly need to blare six-stringed instruments all day long - or renounce her dance music or theater roots - to prove she's got what we like to call "the rock 'n' roll spirit." She is, after all, from Detroit.
Her first two singles were just the proverbial peak of the iceberg. Her full debut ("Madonna") crammed in so many winning songs, of such rhythmic thrust, you could fill a whole night at a dance club and please its most finicky denizens by playing nothing but its remixes. "Holiday," also on that starry debut, remains one of this decade's most electrifying dance hits, while the singles "Lucky Star" and "Borderline" gave Madonna a hold on pure pop.
The star's followup the next year, "Like a Virgin," served up another selection of singles primed to makeyou both dance and sing. In "Material Girl," Madonna scored a true anthem, if one she has spent the rest of her career trying to live down. And the title track became a classic of ironic flirtiness. Another cut, "Into the Groove," commands one of the hottest ones of all time, while "Dress You Up" nearly bursts from its skin with itchy joy.
For 1986's "True Blue," Madonna whipped up one of her most lustrous songs in "Papa Don't Preach."
Unfortunately, the controversy surrounding its supposed anti-abortion stance obscured the richness of the production. The disk also featured Madonna's best forage through Latin pop ("La Isla Bonita") plus a ballad, "Live to Tell," that proved she could deliver an earnest vocal with actual heart.
After putting out a soundtrack ("Who's That Girl," spiked by a kicky title track) and a roiling club mix CD ("You Can Dance"), Madonna came back with her most fully realized CD to date: 1989's "Like a Prayer." Its title track boasted a melody that just keeps escalating in intensity, fully earning its final gospel blowout. The cut "Express Yourself" gave Madonna another dance floor peak, as well as, in its title phrase, some words to live by.
By this point, Madonna had reached such a fever pitch of fame (the subsequent "Blonde Ambition" tour marks her Everest-like summit) that it became harder than ever for the media to distinguish the terrific sounds she was making from the ruckus she regularly whipped up around them.
It didn't help that her 1992 album, "Erotica," represented her most sonically radical piece to date. Drawing on the nocturnal demimonde of gay S&M clubs, "Erotica" re-created the shrouded mood, and dark allure, of an after-hours sex den. Coupled with her widely panned "Sex" book, the project's edge caused a benighted media to turn on her, writing her obituary decades too soon.
As always, she moved blithely on, rebounding commercially with an album, 1994's "Bedtime Stories," that reimagined the then-current trend in "new jill swing" for her own pan-pop audience. The same CD made good use of the burgeoning British trip-hop trend, offering her own corollary in the track "Bedtime Story" to trendoids like Portishead and Massive Attack.
It was Madonna's next move, however, that changed her vocal skills significantly, with a positive impact on all her work since. To prepare for her star turn in "Evita," the star took voice lessons and truly made the most of them. On the soundtrack, Madonna revealed a much fuller, deeper instrument than before, and wound up engaging with the material in a grippingly emotional way. Here, her voice wasn't just a candied part of a larger pop production puzzle, but the prime mover of the recording, its emotional core.
If "Evita" put Madonna in the realm of traditional theater diva (however fleetingly), her next album moved her swiftly back to the cutting edge. "Ray of Light" rode the electronica wave with the grace of an ace surfer at Maui. The 1998 CD streamlined that sound and, as Madonna had done with so many genres before, brought it from the arty edge to the level of irresistible, original pop. The title song boasted the fastest beat of Madonna's career (not counting remixes), and became electronica's greatest hit.
Her chaser of a CD, "Music," popped up that sound even more. The title single stood as her most simple and perfect hit since "Holiday."
Unfortunately, Madonna couldn't make it a hat trick. 2003's "American Life" stands as a clear creative low point, even to her greatest fans. A self-conscious and labored work, it's her only one to fall below platinum status, and deservedly so.
Happily, she turned things around in 2005 by falling back on her original forte: club music. "Confessions on a Dance Floor" may not have represented a return to the zest of her first CD, but it featured several ace singles, one of which made delicious use of an ABBA sample. If nothing else, "Confessions" upstaged the work of most other artists doomed to compete with a catalogue more than two decades deep.
Despite such a lengthy list of achievements, many observers will still try to pawn all the credit off on Madonna's many producers and co-writers. But it strains credibility to assume that any artist could drive so steadily to the top for so long without having her hands solidly on the wheel the whole time.
True, Madonna isn't the kind of artist who can stand alone at a microphone for two hours and hold an audience rapt. And she's never going to record an "Unplugged" CD (let us pray). But not every artist has to be her own island of talent to make a significant impact. In the end, you may not be able to take any one element of Madonna's career or music and have it stand entirely on its own. But the recordings she has helped create still thrive vibrantly outside her image. And for someone with so blinding an image, that's the ultimate testament to power.

Source: Jim Farber, New York Daily News.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Dimanche 9 mars 7 09 /03 /Mars 18:47
- Publié dans : Awards

Les vidéos ont mis Madonna au Rock Hall of Fame.
 

Madonna may be a borderline rocker, but her videos are a big reason for her induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
BY GLENN GAMBOA
March 9, 2008

Madonna has been many things in her 26-year career.
The Material Girl has been a pop star, a video star, a movie star, a singer, a songwriter, an author, a dancer, a label exec, a producer and, most recently, a director.
Calling her a rocker, though, is a bit of a stretch.
Yes, there are a handful of borderline rock songs in her catalog and she did learn the guitar for her "Music" tour. But Madonna is a pop star. When she looks for new musical inspiration, it has almost always come from the dance clubs, embracing electronica and Europop instead of rock.
Does that mean Madonna should be excluded from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Of course not.
"To me, it's the same issue as last year with Grandmaster Flash and 'does hip-hop belong in?'" says Jim Henke, vice president of exhibitions and curatorial affairs at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland. "I think here at the museum and among other inductees, we've always defined rock and roll pretty broadly.
It's not just about four guys with guitars or something like that. Madonna certainly had a huge impact on popular music and rock and roll throughout the '80s and '90s and she's certainly deserving of being honored."
Henke points to Madonna's music, her incorporation of dance elements and her mixing of styles that influenced lots of performers that came after her.
Her biggest contribution, though, was her music videos.
"Madonna takes us into a new era," says Rick Krim, VH1's executive vice president for music and talent programming. "As the years go on, the new eligibles from the MTV era will be different from those who came before them. They will be different from the Ventures or the Dave Clark Five. And Madonna emerged as one of the icons of the video era."
When Madonna made her debut in 1982 with the dance single "Everybody," she seemed like just another dance pop singer, like the countless ones who would follow, from Regina and Martika to Stacey Q and Pebbles.
Once she figured out how to use music videos to sell her image as well as her songs, Madonna, with the help of MTV, was soon in a league of her own.
Established performers who adapted well to music videos improved their careers, but Madonna was the first superstar to be launched on MTV.
"Other acts, like Michael Jackson or Prince, saw their careers taken to another level by videos on MTV," says Krim, who worked at MTV in its early days. "Madonna was born there. She always pushed the limits. Her videos never looked like something somebody else did. We always took everything she did really seriously and we still do."
Starting with "Borderline" in 1984, Madonna turned her videos into events. Teenage girls - dubbed Madonna "wannabes" - quickly copied her various styles, from the crucifixes to the rubber bracelets to the mesh shirts and the underwear as outerwear trends.
Madonna videos became just as important as the songs they represented, sometimes becoming more attention-getting than the songs, either with the controversial "Like a Prayer" and "What It Feels Like for a Girl" clips or the artistic, culture-shaping videos for "Express Yourself" and "Ray of Light," which influenced video and filmmaking styles.
"She is still a musical and cultural icon," Krim says. "She's always finding a way to impact culture and changing with the times, someone who, despite having plenty of exposure, still has a mystique about her. She's a smart woman and done an amazing job managing that career and still having people wanting to see more and hear more. She's not settling back and relying on what she's done in the past. She's always looking ahead."

"Candy" girl
While induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is seen by many as the culmination of a career, Madonna is still moving forward with hers.
Her new album, "Hard Candy" (Warner Bros.), due next month, includes a rumored duet with Justin Timberlake, who will induct her into the Rock Hall. And Krim says it continues the Madonna tradition of pushing the envelope. "It sounds great - it's very 2008," he says. "But it's still very Madonna. She's growing with the times. She's not an oldies act. There's still a lot of anticipation for her new album. Every time she releases a new video, it will be an event and we're going to treat it that way. I believe MTV will, too. She still has a place on MTV and not many 49-year-old artists can say that even though a lot of them would like to."

A true businesswoman
And Madonna is set to push a new envelope, signing a new $120- million business agreement with concert promoter and venue owner Live Nation that makes her the first major artist to partner with a nonmusic company for all her music-related businesses, from her tours to her future album releases.
"Madonna is a true icon and maverick as an artist and in business," Live Nation CEO Michael Rapino said in a statement. "Our partnership is a defining moment in music history. I am thrilled that Madonna, who is also now a shareholder in our company, has joined with us to create a new business model for our industry."
In a statement, Madonna said she felt the new partnership created more opportunities than the traditional major-label model.
"For the first time in my career, the way that my music can reach my fans is unlimited," she says. "I've never wanted to think in a limited way and with this new partnership, the possibilities are endless. Live Nation has offered me a true partnership and after 25 years in the business, I feel that I deserve that."
Apparently, Madonna isn't through attaching new job titles to her resume just yet.

WHEN&WHERE
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction takes place Monday at 8 p.m. at the Waldorf- Astoria Hotel in Manhattan. VH1 Classic will air a live simulcast of the event beginning at 8:30 p.m.

They're in a class of their own
Like Madonna, the rest of this year's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction class stretched the definition of rock in a variety of directions and changed the music of their times.

Leonard Cohen - First known as a poet, then a singer-songwriter, Cohen's dramatic, literary songs in the late '60s, especially "Suzanne" and "Dress Rehearsal Rag," set him as a Canadian Bob Dylan. The songs on his stunning comebacks in the '80s, on "Various Positions" and "I'm Your Man," continue to be rediscovered today, as Jeff Buckley's version of "Hallelujah" or U2's version of "Tower of Song" lead fans to Cohen's originals. Lou Reed will induct Cohen.

The Dave Clark Five - The Beatles' early "British Invasion" rivals, they landed 24 hits on the American charts in less than four years, from 1964 to 1968, including top pop hits "Glad All Over" and "Over and Over." Tom Hanks will induct singer-drummer Dave Clark, singer-keyboardist Mike Smith, guitarist Lenny Davidson, bassist Rick Huxley and saxophonist Denis Payton. A special tribute to Smith, who died of pneumonia Feb. 28, is planned.

John Mellencamp - The Indiana rocker known for little ditties about Jack and Diane and little pink houses for you and me, Mellencamp arrived in the late '70s as John Cougar, the Midwest's answer to New Jersey's Bruce Springsteen. From "Hurts So Good" to "Small Town" to "The Authority Song," Mellencamp was the champion for the heartland, which continues today, leading to the popularity of his songs among this year's presidential candidates' campaigns. Billy Joel will induct Mellencamp.

The Ventures - The most successful band in rock and roll history to do nothing but instrumentals, spanning styles ranging from surf to psychedelic to pop, with hits including "Walk - Don't Run" and the theme from " Hawaii Five-O." John Fogerty will induct guitarists Bob Bogle, Nokie Edwards, Gerry McGee, Don Wilson and drummer Mel Taylor.

Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff - The architects of "The Philly Sound," responsible for hits from the O'Jays; McFadden and Whitehead, and Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, will be inducted as nonperformers by Jerry Butler.

Little Walter - The harmonica master, best known for his work with Muddy Waters, and his solo hit "Juke" in 1952, will be inducted in the Sidemen category by Ben Harper.

- Glenn Gamboa

Source: Newsday.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Samedi 8 mars 6 08 /03 /Mars 15:15
- Publié dans : Awards

Madonna, prenez un salut: la diva de la culture pop honorée pour sa carrière musicale.
 

Madonna_Like A Virgin Tour




This article below features new commentary from Alanis Morissette, Emma Bunton (Spice Girl) and Madonna's father: "It's exciting. I'm happy for her," her father said by phone Friday of his daughter's entry into the Rock Hall.


Madonna, take a bow: Pop culture diva honored for musical career
Saturday, March 8, 2008
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction
Adam Graham / Detroit News Pop Music Writer


She's been called a Boy Toy, the Material Girl and the Queen of Reinvention. On one hand she's been labeled a provocateur, and on the other an opportunist, and in between, everything from a genius to a sinner.
But whatever you call her -- and she's probably heard it all -- on Monday, Michigan's own Madonna adds one more title to her list: Rock and Roll Hall of Famer.
The honor will come at a glittery ceremony at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City, and even at this prestigious, star-studded event -- fellow 2008 inductees include Leonard Cohen, John Mellencamp, the Dave Clark Five and the Ventures, and presenters include Justin Timberlake, Tom Hanks and Billy Joel -- Madonna will be, without a doubt, the biggest star in the room.
There's a reason for that. Over the past three decades, she's been one of the most important and influential forces in pop culture, with her global influence spreading beyond music to books, fashion, music videos, movies -- you name it. She has blanketed every facet of our culture, to the point where her likeness is as recognizable as the McDonald's Golden Arches. She's beyond pop culture, she is pop culture, and the past 25 years would have been unimaginable without her ever-evolving presence.

"She has loomed for a long time as a really significant, really influential figure," said Alan Light, former editor in chief at Spin magazine and a Rock Hall voter who cast his ballot for Madonna's entry. "She is as famous a woman -- if not in the world, certainly in the Western world -- as anybody that's alive."
She made underwear outerwear. She inspired a nation of Madonna-wannabes. She sold tens of millions of albums, formed a mutually beneficial relationship with upstart cable channel MTV, and shocked the world with her ability to deftly and seamlessly change with the times. She pushed many a button -- probably yours, once or twice along the way -- and always made sure you were aware of her. Even if you hated her, you couldn't look away, which played right into her master plan.
After she performed "Holiday" on "American Bandstand" in 1983, Dick Clark asked a young Madonna, "What are your dreams? What's left?"
"To rule the world," Madonna answered.
She wasn't kidding.

Early tragedy

But how was it that Madonna, who was born in Bay City to auto engineer Tony Ciccone and his wife, Madonna Fortin, grew to become so powerful?
It was a mix of street smarts, ruthless ambition and boundless determination, said Madonna biographer Lucy O'Brien.
"I think she has that really rare quality of being totally, totally focused on her work, and never letting up," said O'Brien, author of 2007's "Madonna: Like an Icon" (Harper Entertainment, $24.95).
That work ethic was triggered early on by family tragedy, when her mother died of cancer when Madonna was 5.
The abandonment and the grief from that incident pushed Madonna, O'Brien said, to fill the void it left in her life.
"She craved the love and attention she didn't have," O'Brien said. "I think the audience filled that gap for awhile, but it's one of those things that just goes on and on. I think that's what has made her so restless, to always keep going from one thing to the next."
Born in Bay City on Aug. 16, 1958, Madonna Louise Ciccone moved with her family -- she has five siblings and two half-siblings -- to Pontiac after the death of her mother.
They later relocated to Rochester, where Madonna attended West Middle School and Rochester Adams High School. At Adams, she was an honor roll student, as well as a cheerleader and a member of the choir.
She wasn't cut out for life in Michigan, however, and after graduating from Adams in 1976, she briefly attended the University of Michigan before leaving for New York City in 1977. There, she became a fixture in the city's underground dance club scene.
Combined with her hard-working, middle class background, those gritty New York years where Madonna toughed it out and schooled herself in the arts helped shape the performer she'd become.
"She came out of this downtown New York City club culture, and you can overplay the significance of what that was, but in the end, she has a real awareness of visual art and performance art, and a sensibility about those things," Light said. "Madonna has this ambition to rule the world, but it's this ambition to still be really cool and progressive and forward as an artist while doing it."
She got her chance to be an artist in 1982 when she was signed to Sire Records. Her debut album, titled simply "Madonna," was released in 1983, and you know the story from there: fashion trends, huge singles, major controversies, triumphs, failures, boyfriends, marriages, kids, faux British accents -- all the spoils and trappings that go hand-in-hand with global domination.

A feminist message

What is unique to Madonna is her ability to captivate attention and -- even tougher -- to hold on to it, unwaveringly, for as long as she has. Other pop stars of her era -- think Michael Jackson or Prince -- have seen their stars muted over the years, but Madonna's still shines brightly. Even comparable pop stars such as Janet Jackson, Mariah Carey and Britney Spears have had a hard time sustaining the popularity and consistent level of artistry that Madonna has held on to for so long. Twenty-five years into her career, her albums debut at or near the top of the charts, her tours smash records, and she's one of the most talked-about stars in the world.
Not that there haven't been speed bumps along the way. Partnered with her successes have been many major flops -- "the movie career has always been problematic," Light noted -- but she's always gotten up from them and tried again.
Those failures, it should be noted, have been strictly of an artistic nature; never has she fallen prey to the substance abuse problems that plague so many of today's young celebs.
"She's never had any kind of substance issues whatsoever, and I think that's because her great addiction, for many years, was her career," MTV News correspondent John Norris said. While she didn't come of age in the celeb-scrutinizing era of TMZ, "drink or drugs never got the better of her. You can count on one hand the number of times you've even seen Madonna tipsy."
In addition, Madonna's business acumen, do-it-yourself sensibility and blinding confidence have inspired an entire generation of females, not to mention female pop stars.
"To me, she's this woman that's deeply feminine, combined with this masculine drive," said Canadian pop singer Alanis Morissette, who was signed to Madonna's record label, Maverick Records, in 1995. "For a long time as a kid, I felt very self-conscious about what a tomboy I was, but she was someone that I could always look up to."
Morissette, 33, said Madonna was always supportive of her career when she was on the Maverick label. "I just remember getting these messages from her, championing me, supporting me, and it was always very flattering, and very sweet."
Spice Girl Emma Bunton -- she's "Baby Spice" in the UK quintet -- remembers having Madonna parties as a child, where everyone would dress up as the pop star or risk not being admitted.
"She was this very strong female, out there doing it on her own," Bunton, 32, said. "I loved that. What spoke to me about her is you can get out there, you can dress sexy" but still own your sexuality.
O'Brien said Madonna has always delivered a strong feminist message, "although it's been quite paradoxical at times. She was trying to have it both ways -- to be the sexy siren and be a strong, independent woman -- but she actually pulled it off. There's not a lot of female pop stars that have done that convincingly, and she's been the blueprint for that."

Family and fame

After the titillation of 1992's "Sex" book and high-profile romantic flings, Madonna -- who turns 50 in August -- has settled into what many might call a regular life: a home in the English countryside, a seven-year marriage to British film director Guy Ritchie, three children (one of them controversially adopted from Malawi) and the occasional record-smashing concert tour. (OK, we take back the part about it being "regular.")
And while she has skipped Michigan on her past two tours, she makes time to visit her father, who runs a vineyard in Suttons Bay, Mich. (There are even rumors Madonna has spent time working in the vineyard's tasting room, unbeknownst to her customers.)
"It's exciting. I'm happy for her," her father said by phone Friday of his daughter's entry into the Rock Hall.
Madonna isn't planning to slow down anytime soon: Her 11th studio album, "Hard Candy," is due April 29, and last year she inked a $120 million deal with concert promoter Live Nation that encompasses her albums, touring, merchandise and licensing for the next 10 years. So get used to having her around.
As for any gripes the pop singer doesn't belong in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, save it, said Light.
"If you define rock and roll in any way other than it has to be played with electric guitars and be based on blues changes or whatever, any definition that is more expansive than that -- anything that talks about the rebellious side of it, the counterculture side of it, the creative, ambitious side of it -- she clearly should be there," Light said. "She changed the playing field."

And, in her own way, ruled the world.

 

Madonna_Live Earth


Extras
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction
When:
8:30 p.m. Monday
Where: Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New York City
Watch it: Live on VH1 Classic, Check local listings

Madonna: Like a chameleon
A look at Madonna's various personas through the years:

Boy Toy (1983-85): Marked by her wearing lingerie as outerwear and sporting a belt buckle that spelled out "Boy Toy," this was the fun, flirty Madonna who first captivated America.

Material Girl (1985-86): Inspired by Marilyn Monroe's "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" sequence in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," Madonna romped around in the video for "Material Girl" and sang "We are living in a material world, and I am a material girl." It became an anthem for excess in the Reagan years.

Blond Ambition (1989-90): On her "Like a Prayer" album and subsequent Blond Ambition Tour, Madonna pushed boundaries by playing with religious, sexual and racial themes in her work. These were considered to be her peak years, in terms of power, influence and popularity.

I Can't Keep My Clothes On! (1991-93): The "Erotica" album, the controversial "Sex" book -- a coffee table book that featured a lot of taboo-smashing pictures of a fully naked Madonna -- and the desperate erotic thriller "Body of Evidence" marked Madonna's most naked period. Literally. A backlash set in against the pop star.

Material Mom (1996-99): Following the birth of her daughter, Lourdes, in 1996, Madonna hooked up with electronica producer William Orbit and recorded "Ray of Light," a return to form that wiped away the murk of the early '90s and returned her to the top of the pop charts.

American Cowgirl (2000-01): On her celebrated "Music" album and on the Drowned World Tour, Madonna picked up a guitar and donned a cowgirl hat for a back-to-basics vibe.

Reborn Disco Queen (2005-06): Her 2005 album "Confessions on a Dance Floor" was a return to her New York City dance club roots, and she dyed her hair red and sported a leotard in the album's videos and on the "Confessions" tour. Not bad for a mother of two in her late 40s.

Hip-Hop Honey (2008-): Her next album, "Hard Candy," (due April 29) finds Madonna working with hip-hop heavyweights Timbaland, Pharrell Williams and Nate "Danja" Hills. No word on what look will accompany the material.

Source: Detroit News.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Samedi 8 mars 6 08 /03 /Mars 14:25
- Publié dans : Awards

'Infatigable' Madonna au Rock and Roll Hall of Fame lundi.


Madonna



This article below features new commentary from Mary Lambert, Seymour Stein, Nile Rodgers, Niki Haris, Billy Steinberg, Rick Nowels, Mihran Kirakosian, Eugene Hutz and Pharrell Williams.


'Indefatigable' Madonna to be enshrined in Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Monday
by John Soeder/Plain Dealer Pop Music Critic
Saturday March 08, 2008, 12:00 AM
 

As if dancing in a gondola without falling overboard weren't impressive enough, the Material Girl managed to stare down the king of the jungle, too. It happened in Venice, Italy, during the video shoot for Madonna's 1984 smash "Like a Virgin."
Did we mention the supporting cast included a lion, on loan from a circus?
"Midway through one take, the lion began stalking Madonna," recalls video director Mary Lambert.
The tense scene wasn't in the script. While crew members scrambled to safety, Madonna stood her ground as the big cat padded slowly toward her.
"She was really fearless," Lambert says. "The lion backed off and everything was OK."
It was all in a day's work for Madonna, no stranger to bold moves. With more than 200 million albums sold worldwide, this irrepressible artist is not only the most popular female singer of her generation, but a pop-culture phenomenon on multiple fronts.

On Monday night at New York City's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, she'll be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, along with fellow performers Leonard Cohen, the Dave Clark Five, John Mellencamp and the Ventures. Madonna, who turns 50 in August, is no museum relic, however. Last fall, she inked an unprecedented recording and touring deal with megapromoter Live Nation, worth $120 million. Last month, her movie "Filth and Wisdom" premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival. And her buzzed-about new album, "Hard Candy," comes out Tuesday, April 29.
Madonna declined to be interviewed for this story, although past and present associates contacted by The Plain Dealer shed light on various sides of her complex personality, multifaceted as a mirrored disco ball.
Shape-shifting musical chameleon. Ultra-glamorous star of stage and screen. Trendsetting fashionista. Author of the infamous "SEX" coffee-table book and, er, a series of children's titles. Kabbalah devotee.
She's all of the above, and then some.

Born Madonna Louise Ciccone in Bay City, Mich., she reportedly began turning heads at a young age when she danced in a bikini during a school talent show. Her show-biz dreams led her to Manhattan in 1978. "Take me to the center of everything," she told a cab driver, or so the legend goes.
Her break came when DJ Mark Kamins slipped a demo tape of her song "Everybody" to Sire Records head honcho Seymour Stein, who launched the careers of the Ramones, Talking Heads and the Pretenders.
Madonna and Kamins had a hastily arranged meeting with Stein in the hospital, where he was being treated for a heart ailment. Even though he was hooked up to a penicillin drip at the time, Stein didn't want another record label to snatch up Madonna first.
"The minute she walked in the door, I felt at ease, because I could tell that as much as I wanted to sign her, she wanted to be signed," Stein says.
After contract terms were agreed upon, Stein and Kamins huddled while Madonna waited by the elevator.
"If tonight was Halloween and it was midnight and the shortest way to get to wherever she was going was through a cemetery, she'd take that route," Stein told Kamins. "She's so determined!"
 

Madonna

 

'Who's that girl?'

Her self-titled 1983 debut generated the hit singles "Holiday," "Borderline" and "Lucky Star," although her de facto coming-out party was the 1984 MTV Video Music Awards ceremony.
Madonna stole the show with her performance of "Like a Virgin." A beaming Nile Rodgers, who produced the "Like a Virgin" album, sat next to a baffled Cher in the audience at Radio City Music Hall, as Madonna writhed onstage in a bustier and "BOY TOY" belt buckle.
"Check it out," Rodgers said. "She's going to be the biggest star in the world!"
The former Chic guitarist was basking in the multiplatinum afterglow of David Bowie's "Let's Dance" album, which Rodgers produced, when he teamed up with Madonna.
Among the tunes they ended up recording was a string-laden cover of the Rose Royce ballad "Love Don't Live Here Anymore." Overcome with emotion, Madonna choked up.
"She did another take, which she thought was better," Rodgers says. "I don't know how I won this argument, because you don't win many with her, but I wanted the more emotional performance and we left the crying on the record."
When it came to choosing the project's all-important leadoff single, however, Madonna wouldn't budge. Rodgers thought it should be "Material Girl," but "Like a Virgin" got Madonna's vote.
"Madonna said losing your virginity is one of the most important things for a girl," Rodgers says. "I ran it past as many women as possible, and they all came up with the right answer. They said this record was going to be No. 1 for six weeks. And it was - six weeks, on the dot."
When they weren't in the studio, Madonna and Rodgers often went out for a night on the town.
"Every time I'd walk into a restaurant or a club with her, you'd hear, 'Who's that girl?,' over and over again," Rodgers says.
Once just about everyone on the planet knew who that girl was, the question became: "What'll she do next?"
The video for Madonna's gospel-tinged 1989 hit "Like a Prayer," also directed by Lambert, was rife with controversial imagery, including burning crosses.
"I think Madonna enjoys controversy," Lambert says. "But I don't think that is or was her goal in life, to create controversy."
Regardless, she hasn't lost her taste for it. Vatican officials and other religious leaders criticized Madonna for a production number involving a giant cross and a crown of thorns on her 2006 Confessions Tour.
From the get-go, Madonna always had clear ideas about which images she wanted to project to the world, Lambert says.
"There was something about Madonna, and there still is," Lambert says. "She has an amazing charisma. She has the ability to be really open and really give it up, without giving it away.
"Somehow she manages to keep her mystery and her self-respect.
"That's why she continues to have an allure for the press and with the public."

 
Madonna and Britney Spears
 

Drawbacks to celebrity

Niki Haris had a steady gig with the Righteous Brothers in Las Vegas when she was summoned to Los Angeles to audition for a spot as a backing vocalist on Madonna's Who's That Girl Tour in 1987.
"I wasn't super-familiar with her," Haris says. "She reminded me of many girls I grew up with - small cheerleader-type, dancer body."
Haris got the job.
"Within an hour, I was in Madonna's car, trying to call Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield to tell them I wasn't going to make it back," Haris says. "She made it very clear: 'This is what you're doing. Call them now. Here - use my phone.'
"I remember thinking, 'Whoa! She really gets what she wants!'"
Haris went on to do several tours with Madonna. Haris also sang on Madonna's albums and appeared in her videos. They became close friends.
"We hung out, went to dinner, watched movies at home ... a lot of black-and-white films, a lot of foreign films," Haris says. "There was a period when Madonna watched a lot of Pedro Almodovar. She loved his stuff."
Their relationship became strained during Madonna's Drowned World Tour in 2001.
"I saw the fishbowl get smaller around her," Haris says. "You had to go through this person to get to this person to get a message to her. She was more trusting and loving and open in the early days.
"She threw a baby shower for me, then I never heard from her again. ... I'd watched her do it to other people. It's part of the superstar machine - like, 'OK, we're done with you. Next!'"

In the late 1980s, a mutual acquaintance introduced Madonna to songwriters Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly, the duo responsible for penning her biggest hit to date, "Like a Virgin." Madonna had followed their demo almost note for note, although they first crossed paths with her - with "Warren Beatty in tow," Steinberg says - years later in Beverly Hills, at a black-tie birthday party for her manager.
"Oh, Madonna, I've wanted to meet you for so long!" Steinberg gushed.
"Well, now you did," Madonna replied, then walked away.

Ouch!
"Yeah, I felt a little crestfallen," Steinberg says. After "Like a Virgin," he and Kelly went on to write hits for Cyndi Lauper ("True Colors") and Whitney Houston ("So Emotional"), among others.
"I tried to interest Madonna in covering another one of our songs, but I never could get a response," Steinberg says.
No hard feelings, though.
"I'm a big Madonna fan," Steinberg says. "I think she's actually very underrated as a songwriter.
"I happen to know that Madonna often writes songs to tracks that people give her. She's writing the lyric and the melody, which is huge.
"She's a really effective pop singer, too."

Rick Nowels co-wrote three songs with Madonna, including the hit "The Power of Good-bye," for her 1998 album "Ray of Light," a dazzling foray into cutting-edge electronica.
"She's incredibly focused," Nowels says.
Madonna would show up at his Los Angeles studio at 3 p.m. By the time she left four hours later, they usually would have completed a new song, from scratch.
As a tunesmith, Madonna ranks up there with the likes of Billy Joel, Sting and Carole King, Nowels says.
"Madonna is a great songwriter," he says. "She has the gift of writing simple but poignant melodies and words."

 
Madonna at Live Earth

 

 
Pursuing her vision


Madonna had another landmark moment at the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards, where she kissed Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera onstage, symbolically passing the torch (or was it the tongue?) to a new generation.
Or was Madonna sucking the life force out of her young competition?
"She created the template for the postmodern female pop star," says Lucy O'Brien, author of "Madonna: Like an Icon," a biography published last year.
"Madonna has embraced so many different genres and come up with some amazing concepts," O'Brien says. "That's her strength, that she can move in so many different directions and bring it all together.
"She feels she can still compete with artists who are half her age, too. She's not fazed by that. ... She's just indefatigable."

The late James Brown was billed as "the hardest working man in show business," although even he might've felt like a slacker next to Madonna.
"She comes into the arena in the afternoon for a two- to four-hour sound check every day before the show," says dancer Mihran Kirakosian, a grizzled veteran of Madonna's past couple of tours.
She was constantly fine-tuning the music and choreography, Kirakosian says.

Working 12-, 14- or 16-hour days was the norm for the "Filth and Wisdom" cast, according to Eugene Hutz. He plays a cross-dressing dominatrix in the film, an offbeat comedy. It marks Madonna's directorial debut.
"Her style was very gonzo beatnik for the most part, but then suddenly she would get incredibly scrupulous and specific," says Hutz, leader of the gypsy punk band Gogol Bordello.
There is talk of releasing the movie soon via iTunes, he says.
"Filth and Wisdom" is about "pursuing your vision," Hutz says. "And Madonna certainly has done that."

Her upcoming album promises to venture deeper into uncharted creative territory, via hip-hop-savvy, club-thumping songs.
"Hard Candy" is "one of the best albums in years," says the Neptunes' Pharrell Williams, who collaborated with Madonna on a couple of new tracks.
Other contributors to the project include Timbaland and Justin Timberlake, who is set to induct Madonna into the Rock Hall. (For unspecified reasons, she won't perform at the ceremony, leaving fellow Michigan natives Iggy Pop and the Stooges to do a number or two in her place.)
Madonna "worked me to death," Williams says. "But you know what? I'm glad I was pushed, because it's some of my best work."

As for Madonna, her greatest creation remains Madonna herself. As she puts it in "The Confessions Tour" DVD: "I am the art."
Despite the pop bent of her music, Madonna belongs in the Rock Hall, says Stein, president emeritus of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation's board of directors.
Madonna has "a true rock 'n' roll spirit," Stein says.
"She takes chances. She doesn't care about the odds. She cares about whether she believes in something or not.
"Believe it or not, Madonna is one of the easiest artists I ever worked with, because she knew what she wanted. And she was almost always right, too."


Source: Cleveland/Plain Dealer.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Vendredi 7 mars 5 07 /03 /Mars 23:57
- Publié dans : Awards

Madonna at Live Earth



By DAVID BAUDER, AP Entertainment Writer

NEW YORK - Admit it. When Madonna was writhing around onstage in a wedding gown to "Like a Virgin" years ago, the last place you'd expect to see her was in something called the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Time has a way of changing things. On Monday, Madge will come to the stage of the Waldorf-Astoria to accept enshrinement. Classmate John Mellencamp, who also churned out hit after hit in the 1980s, will join her.
The Dave Clark Five, whose lead singer Mike Smith died of pneumonia on Feb. 28, are being inducted as well as Philly soul legends Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, Canadian songwriter Leonard Cohen, surf rockers the Ventures and blues harmonica ace Little Walter.
But Madonna?
She's the pre-eminent pop star of her generation, who stayed a step ahead of trends while adding in shock value to keep herself in the news. Along the way she's made sturdy, state-of-the-art pop such as "Material Girl," "Crazy For You," "Papa Don't Preach," "Cherish," "Like a Prayer," "Vogue" and "Ray of Light."
Yet "if you think of rock 'n' roll, Madonna is not the first name that comes to mind," said Steve Morse, longtime Boston Globe music critic who was a member of the hall of fame's nominating committee for seven years.
He considers her selection, particularly in her first year of eligibility, an embarrassment.
Her music was never played on rock 'n' roll radio, he said. Some veteran rock artists like Deep Purple, the J. Geils Band, Steve Miller and Alice Cooper are still waiting for induction. Morse long and unsuccessfully argued on behalf of the late Gram Parsons.
"It seems like this is driven by commercial achievement and sales, rather than having anything to do with the rock 'n' roll genre," Morse said. "It's really a commercial move. They'll be able to sell more tickets to the museum and more people will watch the broadcast."
With rock's founding fathers already in the hall, the museum has broadened its meaning of rock 'n' roll to include rap and pop artists. Grandmaster Flash last year became the first hip-hop artist to make it.
Madonna, who declined interview requests, will answer on Monday night.
She's being inducted by Justin Timberlake. And unlike many contemporary artists — Madonna's new album, "Hard Candy," is dropping April 29she's not scheduled to perform. Instead, she chose Iggy Pop, the ultimate crawl-around-on-glass punk rocker who shares her Michigan ancestry, to salute her work.
Tom Hanks will induct the Dave Clark Five, the '60s British pop band behind the hit "Glad All Over." Billy Joel will give the speech for Mellencamp, and Lou Reed speaks on behalf of fellow literate songwriter Cohen.
For the second straight year, VH1 Classic will show the induction ceremony live at 8:30 p.m. EDT.

Source: AP.
 

Madonna mène la classe dans le rock hall.


Madonna, qui a décliné les demandes d'interview, répondra lundi soir aux attaques disant qu'elle ne mérite pas d'être au Rock Hall.

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Vendredi 7 mars 5 07 /03 /Mars 23:47
- Publié dans : Awards

Posted on Fri, Mar. 7, 2008

'80s and '90s, and she's certainly deserving of being honored."
Henke points to Madonna's music, her incorporation of dance elements and her mixing of styles that influenced lots of performers that came after her.
Her biggest contribution, though, was her music videos.
"Madonna takes us into a new era," says Rick Krim, VH1's executive vice president for music and talent programming. "As the years go on, the new eligibles from the MTV era will be different from those who came before them. They will be different from the Ventures or the Dave Clark Five. And Madonna emerged as one of the icons of the video era."
When Madonna made her debut in 1982 with the dance single "Everybody," she seemed like just another dance-pop singer, like the countless ones who would follow, from Regina and Martika to Stacey Q and Pebbles.
Once she figured out how to use music videos to sell her image as well as her songs, Madonna, with the help of MTV, was soon in a league of her own.
Established performers who adapted well to music videos improved their careers, but Madonna was the first superstar to be launched on MTV.
"Other acts, like Michael Jackson or Prince, saw their careers taken to another level by videos on MTV," says Krim, who worked at MTV in its early days. "Madonna was born there. She always pushed the limits. Her videos never looked like something somebody else did. We always took everything she did really seriously and we still do."
Starting with "Borderline" in 1984, Madonna turned her videos into events. Teenage girls - dubbed Madonna "wannabes" - quickly copied her various styles, from the crucifixes to the rubber bracelets to the mesh shirts and the underwear as outerwear trends.
Madonna videos became just as important as the songs they represented, sometimes becoming more attention-getting than the songs, either with the controversial "Like a Prayer" and "What It Feels Like for a Girl" clips or the artistic, culture-shaping videos for "Express Yourself" and "Ray of Light," which influenced video and filmmaking styles.
"She is still a musical and cultural icon," Krim says. "She's always finding a way to impact culture and changing with the times, someone who, despite having plenty of exposure, still has a mystique about her.
She's a smart woman and done an amazing job managing that career and still having people wanting to see more and hear more. She's not settling back and relying on what she's done in the past. She's always looking ahead
."
While induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is seen by many as the culmination of a career, Madonna is still moving forward with hers.
Her new album, "Hard Candy" (Warner Bros.), due next month, includes a rumored duet with Justin Timberlake, who will induct her into the Rock Hall. And Krim says it continues the Madonna tradition of pushing the envelope.
"It sounds great - it's very 2008," he says. "But it's still very Madonna. She's growing with the times. She's not an oldies act. There's still a lot of anticipation for her new album. Every time she releases a new video, it will be an event and we're going to treat it that way. I believe MTV will, too. She still has a place on MTV and not many 49-year-old artists can say, that even though a lot of them would like to." *
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction takes place Monday at 8 p.m. in New York. VH1 Classic will air a live simulcast of the event beginning at 8:30 p.m.

Source: Philadelphia Daily News.
 

Madonna: Pas vraiment une rockeuse, mais une icône de rock néanmoins.


La cérémonie du Rock and Roll Hall of Fame a lieu lundi à 20h00 à New York
VH1 Classic diffusera l'événement en direct à 20h30.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Lundi 3 mars 1 03 /03 /Mars 23:19
- Publié dans : Awards

3/3/08, 2:46 pm EST

According to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Iggy & The Stooges will perform for Madonna at this year’s induction ceremony. The choice of the Stooges may raise some eyebrows, but isn’t as strange as it seems: both the band and Madonna are Detroit natives, and Iggy Pop opened for Madonna at the Dublin date for her Reinvention Tour in 2004.
Other performers scheduled at the induction ceremony, which takes place next Monday, March 10th, at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria Hotel: Damien Rice (for Leonard Cohen); James Cotton (for Little Walter); Patti LaBelle (for Gamble & Huff); plus John Mellencamp and the Ventures, both of whom are being inducted.

Source: Rolling Stone.
 

Iggy & The Stooges vont chanter pour Madonna à la Cérémonie du Rock Hall.

Selon le Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Iggy & The Stooges vont chanter pour Madonna à la cérémonie d'induction de cette année. Le choix des Stooges peut faire lever quelques sourcils, mais ce n'est pas aussi étrange qu'il y paraît: le groupe et Madonna sont tous deux natifs de Detroit et Iggy Pop a fait la première partie de Madonna à Dublin lors de son Reinvention Tour en 2004.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Samedi 1 mars 6 01 /03 /Mars 23:41
- Publié dans : Awards

She might play pop, but that doesn’t mean she shouldn’t be in the Rock Hall

Madonna started out playing drums for the indie rock band Breakfast Club. If you think rock hasn't influenced her sound, you're mistaken.


Madonna_Live Earth



COMMENTARY

By Tony Sclafani
MSNBC contributor
updated 6:39 p.m. ET Feb. 29, 2008

One of the first-ever mentions of Madonna in a national publication came in March 1984, when the new wave magazine Trouser Press ran a feature on DJ Jellybean Benitez, who was then remixing tracks for the singer. The article notes Benitez was “engaged to remix three tracks by disco/pop/rock crossover hopeful Madonna.”

Madonna may not be a “hopeful” anymore, but with her March 10 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inching closer, people are again arguing about what kind of music she makes. In a recent msnbc.com commentary, Michael Ventre claimed Madonna’s music wasn’t rock and her induction would “undermine the credibility” of the Rock Hall. But that’s not a feeling shared by all rock fans. Madonna might not be your standard rock performer, but she’s rock-oriented enough to justify getting inducted (we’ll get to the topic of the Hall’s “credibility” later).

Contrary to Ventre’s assertions, Madonna’s early career trajectory did, in fact, follow that of rock bands like the Beatles. She started out playing New York clubs in 1979 as the drummer for the rock band Breakfast Club, before moving to lead vocals. In 1980 and 1981, she fronted the dance rock band Emmy. You don’t play rock for three years without it having some influence.

After Madonna signed with Sire Records, she continued working with Breakfast Club keyboardist Pat Leonard and Emmy drummer Stephen Bray to write some of her biggest hits, including “Into the Groove,” “Express Yourself,” “Cherish” and “Like a Prayer.” None are rock per se, but all use rock as a jumping off point. Audible evidence of Madonna’s rock roots can be found on the collection of early demos “Pre-Madonna.”

Madonna’s vocals are the key to her rock roots. Pop vocalists usually sing songs “straight,” but Madonna employs subtext, irony, aggression and all sorts of vocal idiosyncrasies in the ways John Lennon and Bob Dylan did. The ambiguity she brought to songs like “Like a Virgin” and “Holiday” never lets you know whether they were supposed to be happy, sad, satirical or all of the above. Even Madonna’s early “Minnie Mouse singing” style can be traced back to rock: the Beatles made use of similar sped-up vocals starting in 1966.

When Madonna hit the big time, her shock-your-mama presentation incited outrage like it was Elvis’ hip shakin’ heyday all over again. This caused Baby Boomers to dismiss her music as lightweight in much the same way the generation before them dismissed early rock and rollers. But in retrospect, there’s little that’s lightweight in the social commentary of “Material Girl” or “Like a Virgin,” or in the personal issues Madonna tackles in “Live to Tell,” “Keep it Together” and countless other tunes.

A corporate affair
Now let’s look at the Rock Hall. And let’s admit that it’s largely a high-level corporate soiree for record industry business people and their top-earning employees and associates.

To find out why this is, look to the Hall’s governing “foundation” (a word, by the way, that should never be used in conjunction with the phrase “rock and roll”). In 2001, Fox News’ Roger Friedman reported on how foundation director Suzan Evans was looking to get big names inducted so the Hall could sell tickets to the dinner. That explains why Eric Clapton, George Harrison and Paul McCartney have been inducted multiple times as band members and solo acts.

As Ventre correctly noted, the Rock Hall has also gone from inducting rock pioneers (Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly) to celebrating major label acts that have sold lots of product. Michael Jackson is a member. So are Billy Joel, James Taylor and the Bee Gees. Yet influential rockers like Iggy Pop, Wanda Jackson and Joan Jett are left out in the cold. Hardcore punk and progressive rock are unrepresented.

This is because the induction process is influenced by Rolling Stone magazine founder Jann Wenner, who helped conceive the Rock Hall. Last year there were accusations of Wenner engaging in vote fixing in order to ensure rappers Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five an induction.

So any questions of Madonna’s ruining the Rock Hall’s “credibility” are beside the point. What credibility is there, really? Critic Joel Selvin has pointed out that selections are also based on the personal tastes of a bunch of East Coast industry types. More and more, these people have given us a Rock Hall filled with critically correct “artists,” who thrill Baby Boomers but bore everyone else. Just in case anyone was wondering why Black Flag hasn’t been inducted yet, there’s your answer.

Risqué business
Considering all of this, Madonna’s induction is refreshing. Unlike some of the above names, her induction (and exhibit) should bring a sense of excitement to the Rock Hall. Will she say something crazy in her speech? Wonder what her performance will be like?

It’s this spirit that rock and rollers — not pop stars — brought to mainstream culture back in the day. Madonna’ persona has been called calculated, but if you do a little research, you’ll find there was also calculation in the way the Rolling Stones and countless other “scandalous” bands were presented to the public. The difference is there was less behind-the-scenes media documentation of celebrities back then.

Having the nerve to title an album “Like a Virgin” in the conservative early 1980s is the type of thing rockers do, not pop artists. A lot of Madonna’s career moves seem, in retrospect, logical or inevitable, but at the time they were anything but. By mapping out her work on her own terms (another rocker characteristic) Madonna often risked commercial and artistic disaster. That’s likely a big reason Madonna has served as a touchstone for so many performers that followed her and it has gotten her songs covered by artists from John Wesley Harding to Sonic Youth to Tori Amos.

It’s ironic that Madonna’s Rock Hall induction stands a better chance of causing a commotion than would appearances by any numbers of bona fide rockers. But then, that’s the sort of thing that made the one-time “disco/pop/rock crossover” a definitive rock star.

Tony Sclafani is an East Coast entertainment writer and music critic.
 

Source: MSNBC.
 

Madonna: Une vraie rock star.

Elle joue peut-être de la pop, mais cela ne signifie pas qu'elle ne devrait pas être dans le Rock Hall
 

Madonna a commencé à jouer de la batterie dans le groupe rock indépendant Breakfast Club. Si vous pensez que le rock n'a pas influencé son son, vous vous trompez.

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Mardi 26 février 2 26 /02 /Fév 23:42
- Publié dans : Awards

Timberlake to induct Madonna into Hall of Fame
26/02/2008 07:25

Madonna has asked Justin Timberlake to honour her when she's inducted into the Rock + Roll Hall of Fame next month (10Mar08). Each inductee is asked to invite a fellow celebrity or a family member to the New York gala to pay tribute to the artist's work - and Madonna felt her most recent collaborator, Timberlake, would be the perfect choice, according to U.S. magazine In Touch Weekly. This year's induction ceremony will take place at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City on 10 March (08). Joining Madonna will be Leonard Cohen, The Dave Clark Five, John Mellencamp and The Ventures, who will make up the class of 2008.

Source: Contact Music.
 

Madonna a demandé à Justin Timberlake de l'introniser dans son Hall of Fame.

Madonna a demandé à Justin Timberlake de l'honorer quand elle sera intronisée dans le Rock + Roll Hall of Fame le mois prochain (10Mars08). Chaque intronisé est prié d'inviter une célébrité ou un membre de sa famille au gala à New York pour rendre hommage à l'œuvre de l'artiste - et Madonna a ressenti que son plus récent collaborateur, Timberlake, serait le choix idéal, selon le magazine américain In Touch Weekly. Cette année, la cérémonie aura lieu à l'hôtel Waldorf-Astoria à New York le 10 mars (08). Joignant Madonna il y aura Leonard Cohen, The Dave Clark Five, John Mellencamp et The Ventures, qui vont constituer la classe de 2008.

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Mardi 26 février 2 26 /02 /Fév 23:30
- Publié dans : Awards

Justin Timberlake To Induct Madonna Into Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Tom Hanks to induct Dave Clark Five; Lou Reed to honor Leonard Cohen.
Feb 26 2008 1:24 PM EST


Justin Timberlake will induct Madonna into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at the organization's March 10 ceremony, a rep for the Hall confirmed to MTV News Tuesday (February 26).
Perhaps Timberlake is returning a favor from his 27th birthday last month, when Madonna presented him with a cupcake and champagne and sang him "Happy Birthday" on the set of the video for her song "4 Minutes to Save the World." The track features JT as well as Timbaland; the two collaborated on several songs for Madonna's forthcoming LP.
Other inductors include Tom Hanks (for '60s group the Dave Clark Five — appropriate because he played the manager of a similar group in the 1996 film "That Thing You Do"), Lou Reed (for folk legend Leonard Cohen), Billy Joel (for John Mellencamp), Ben Harper (for blues harmonica player Little Walter), Jerry Butler (for legendary soul producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff) and John Fogerty (for instrumental group the Ventures).
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony will take place at New York's Waldorf Astoria hotel on March 10.
To be eligible for nomination this year, an artist must have issued their first single or album by 1982, which was the year Madonna put out her first dance tune,
"Everybody." While no one would confuse her decades of dance-floor anthems with rock and roll, the most successful female artist of all time has had a remarkably strong, nearly three-decade career.

Source: MTV News.

Justin Timberlake and Madonna

Justin Timberlake and Madonna
 

Justin Timberlake va introniser Madonna au Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.


Justin Timberlake va introniser Madonna au Rock'n'Roll Hall of Fame à la cérémonie du 10 mars, un responsable du Hall a confirmé à MTV News.
La cérémonie du Rock and Roll Hall of Fame aural lieu à l'hôtel Waldorf Astoria le 10 mars à New-York.

Pour être éligible à la nomination cette année, un artiste doit avoir sorti son premier single ou son premier album en 1982, qui l'année où Madonna sortait son premier single, "Everybody".
Tandis que personne ne confond ses décennies d'hymnes de dance avec le rock'n'roll, l'artiste féminine la plus couronnée de succès de tous les temps a eu une carrière remarquablement forte, presque sur trois décennies.

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Samedi 23 février 6 23 /02 /Fév 23:35
- Publié dans : Awards

Exclusive: Madonna Will Not Perform at the 2008 Rock Hall Induction Ceremony
02.22.08 09:07 PM | 2008 Ceremony

Future Rock Hall has learned that Madonna will not be performing at the 2008 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on March 10th, though she does plan to attend. No word on who will be asked to perform Madonna's music at the event.
This is undoubtedly a huge blow to organizers who were counting on Madonna to provide the star power at this year's event. Given the health of the Dave Clark Five's Mike Smith, it's unclear if they will perform either. The remaining 2008 inductees who will perform are John Mellencamp, the Ventures, and Leonard Cohen.
On March 10th, the Induction Ceremony will be broadcast live on VH1 Classic, and (presumably) webcast at AOL's spinner.com.

Source: The Future Rock Hall Blog.
 

Madonna ne chantera pas à la cérémonie du Rock Hall de 2008.

Madonna ne chantera pas mais assistera à la cérémonie. Aucun mot sur celui à qui on demandera de faire la musique de Madonna à l'événement.
Le 10 mars, la cérémonie d'intronisation sera retransmise en direct sur VH1 Classic, et (probablement) en webcast sur spinner.com d'AOL.

 

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Lundi 11 février 1 11 /02 /Fév 23:54
- Publié dans : Awards

Madonna's The Confessions Tour DVD (video director: Jonas Akerlund, video producers: Sara Martin and David May) won a Grammy Award last night for Best Long Form Music Video.
 

Le DVD du Confessions Tour gagne un Grammy Award.

Le DVD du Confessions Tour de Madonna (réalisateur: Jonas Akerlund, producteurs: Sara Martin et David May) a gagné un Grammy Award la nuit dernière pour la Meilleure Longue Vidéo de Musique.

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Samedi 22 décembre 6 22 /12 /Déc 23:57
- Publié dans : Awards

CLEVELAND (AP) -- Madonna was announced as a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee along with John Mellencamp, The Ventures, Leonard Cohen and The Dave Clark Five.

A panel of 600 industry figures selected the five acts to be inducted at the annual ceremony, to be held March 10 in New York. To be eligible, artists must have issued a first single or album at least 25 years before nomination.

Madonna Louise Ciccone signed with Sire Records in 1982 and became one of MTV’s first stars two years later with "Like A Virgin." She has constantly altered her image ever since, showing staying power that few ’80s stars could muster.

This is Madonna's first year of eligibility as her debut single, "Everybody", was released twenty-five years ago in 1982. So Madonna is voted into Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame on the first try.


Madonna introduite au "Rock and Roll Hall of Fame"

Madonna sera introduite au "Rock and Roll Hall of Fame" avec John Mellencamp, The Ventures, Leonard Cohen et The Dave Clark Five.

Un jury de 600 figures de l'industrie a choisi les cinq artistes à être introduits lors de la cérémonie annuelle, qui sera tenue le 10 mars à New York. Pour être éligible, les artistes doivent avoir sorti un premier single ou album au moins 25 ans avant la nomination.

Madonna Louise Ciccone a signé avec Sire Records en 1982 et est devenue une des premières stars de MTV deux ans plus tard avec "Like A Virgin". Elle a changé constamment son image depuis, montrant un constant pouvoir que peu de stars des années 80 pourrait rassembler.

C'est la première année d'admissibilité de Madonna car son premier single, "Everybody", est sorti il y a vingt-cinq ans en 1982. Madonna est donc introduite au "Rock and Roll Hall of Fame" dès le premier essai.

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Communauté : Madonna Fans' World
Vendredi 21 décembre 5 21 /12 /Déc 23:57
- Publié dans : Awards

Best Long Form Music Video
(For video album packages consisting of more than one song or track. Award to the Artist and to the Video Director/Producer of at least 51% of the total playing time.)

Live & Loud At The Fillmore - Dierks Bentley
Trapped In The Closet Chapters 13-22 - R. Kelly
The Confessions Tour - Madonna (Jonas Akerlund, video director; Sara Martin & David May, video producers, [Warner Bros.] )
10 Days Out - Blues From The Backroads - Kenny Wayne Shepherd & Various Artists 
Liberacion - The Songs Of The New Cuban Underground - Various Artists

The Grammy Award ceremony takes place in Los Angeles on 10 February, 2008.
 

Le DVD du Confessions Tour nommé pour un Grammy

La cérémonie des Grammy Award a lieu à Los Angeles le 10 février 2008.

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MDNA WORLD TOUR

 

MDNA 2012 WORLD TOUR

MIDDLE EAST
05-31 Tel Aviv, Israel
 
WESTERN ASIA
06-03 Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
06-04 Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
06-07 Istanbul, Turkey
 
EUROPE
06-11 Zagreb, Croatia - Cancelled
06-12 Rome, Italy - NEW
06-14 Milan, Italy
06-16 Florence, Italy
06-20 Barcelona, Spain
06-21 Barcelona, Spain
06-24 Coimbra, Portugal
06-28 Berlin, Germany
06-30 Berlin, Germany
 
07-02 Copenhagen, Denmark
07-04 Gothenburg, Sweden
07-07 Amsterdam, Netherlands
07-08 Amsterdam, Netherlands
07-10 Koln (Cologne), Germany
07-12 Brussels, Belgium
07-14 Paris, France
07-17 London, UK
07-19 Birmingham, UK
07-21 Edinburgh, Scotland
07-24 Dublin, Ireland
07-26 L'Olympia, Paris, France - NEW

07-29 Vienna, Austria
 
08-01 Warsaw, Poland
08-04 Kiev, Ukraine
08-07 Moscow, Russia
08-09 St. Petersburg, Russia
08-12 Helsinki, Finland
08-15 Oslo, Norway
08-18 Zurich, Switzerland
08-21 Nice, France
 
NORTH AMERICA
08-28 Philadelphia, US
08-30 Montreal, Canada
 
09-01 Quebec City, Canada
09-04 Boston, US
09-06 New York, US
09-08 New York, US
09-10 Ottawa, Canada
09-12 Toronto, Canada
09-13 Toronto, Canada
09-15 Atlantic City, US
09-19 Chicago, US
09-20 Chicago, US
09-23 Washington D.C., US
09-24 Washington D.C., US
09-29 Vancouver, Canada
09-30 Vancouver, Canada
 
10-02 Seattle, US
10-03 Seattle, US
10-06 San Jose, US
10-07 San Jose, US
10-10 Los Angeles, US
10-11 Los Angeles, US
10-13 Las Vegas, US
10-14 Las Vegas, US
10-16 Phoenix, US
10-18 Denver, US
10-20 Dallas, US - Cancelled (ill)
10-21 Dallas, US
10-24 Houston, US
10-25 Houston, US
10-27 New Orleans, US
10-30 Kansas City, US
 
11-01 St. Louis, US
11-03 St. Paul, US
11-04 St. Paul, US
11-06 Pittsburgh, US
11-08 Detroit, US
11-10 Cleveland, US
11-12 New York, US
11-13 New York, US - NEW

11-15 Charlotte, US
11-17 Atlanta, US
11-19 Miami, US
11-20 Miami, US
 
SOUTH AMERICA
11-24 Mexico City, Mexico
11-25 Mexico City, Mexico - NEW
 
11-28 Medellin, Colombia
11-29 Medellin, Colombia - NEW
 
12-01 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
(Dec. 01 deferred to Dec. 02)
12-02 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

12-04 Sao Paulo, Brazil
12-05 Sao Paulo, Brazil
12-09 Porto Alegre, Brazil
12-13 Buenos Aires, Argentina
12-15 Buenos Aires, Argentina
12-19 Santiago, Chile
12-22 Cordoba, Argentina
 
MDNA 2013 WORLD TOUR

AUSTRALIA
January - Cancelled
 
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