JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon treated like Madonna

Publié le par madonnafansworld

Jamie Dimon, patron de JPMorgan, traité comme Madonna.


"Now Everyone Just Uses Jamie's First Name, Like Madonna"
Courtney Comstock | Jul. 14, 2010, 3:29 PM

An article about Jamie Dimon just came out in the New York Times that says now everyone's treating the JPMorgan CEO like Madonna.
"He is now commonly referred to by a single name, like Pelé or Madonna."
We doubt anyone normal would know who we were talking about if we just randomly referred to a "Jamie," so we asked a JPMorgan-er inside the bank if it was true.
He eagerly confirmed with us:
It's just "Jamie. Definitely."
More praise:
He's "a charismatic leader who charms congressmen and credit traders alike."
Everyone loves Jamie:
Right now, there are virtually no giants on Wall Street except maybe Jamie,” said David M. Rubenstein, a founder of the Carlyle Group.
It's easy to see why. He replies to interns' emails, gives them a thoughtful extensive reading list for the summer, gives everyone a waffle maker. Plus, check out His Amazing Life.
He really is like the Madonna of banking.

Source: Business Insider.


From "The New York Times":

After Crisis, Show of Power From JPMorgan
By ERIC DASH
Published: July 14, 2010

Jamie Dimon is not the modern-day John Pierpont Morgan. He is not the new king of Wall Street, and he’s certainly not President Obama’s BBF (best banker friend).
At least, that’s what he will tell you over lunch at the Park Avenue headquarters of JPMorgan Chase, the descendant of the House of Morgan that came through the global financial crisis bigger, stronger and healthier than its rivals.
But taking a victory lap, or even basking in the adulation he has received while his fellow bank chiefs have been pounded, is the last thing Mr. Dimon claims to want. He knows all too well the dangers of swaggering in the footsteps of former Wall Street kings like Sanford I. Weill, his onetime mentor, who helped build Citigroup into an institution so unwieldy it nearly went bankrupt, or Lloyd C. Blankfein, the Goldman Sachs chief whose crown has been tarnished by accusations of double-dealing under his watch.
(...)
JPMorgan, in particular, is poised to increase its profit and gain market share in several businesses as many of its competitors continue to struggle to get back on their feet.
The crisis cemented Mr. Dimon’s reputation as a financial superstar — a bold dealmaker who buys when others are selling, a strict risk manager who resisted the type of exotic businesses that felled others and a charismatic leader who charms lawmakers and credit traders alike. He is now commonly referred to by a single name, like Pelé or Madonna.
Right now, there are virtually no giants on Wall Street except maybe Jamie,” said David M. Rubenstein, a founder of the Carlyle Group and a longtime financial and political hand.
Mr. Dimon earned that distinction by playing as much defense as offense during the housing boom, which insulated JPMorgan more than most when the boom went bust. Then, when the bust became a full-blown financial crisis, Mr. Dimon went hunting for bargains, significantly expanding his position in investment and retail banking while others were shrinking.
Now, those efforts are paying off. Even with a slowdown in trading, analysts are forecasting a profit of 70 cents a share when JPMorgan reports its second-quarter earnings on Thursday, about the same as a year ago.

JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon treated like Madonna
Jamie Dimon

Publié dans Newspapers

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